Decorating

Your old Pyrex could be worth thousands of dollars

Check your Mum's kitchen cupboards - immediately!
Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis

Remember that old Pyrex glass dish sitting over the back of your mum’s cupboard? Turns out it could be a collector’s item – and could earn you loads of cash!

In fact, one set of vintage Pyrex fetched around $US$1,800 on Etsy.

And this JAJ Pyrex Hawthorne Spacesaver is currently selling for AU$759.32 on Etsy, while a set of American mixing bowls is going for AU$865.05.

Rainbow Pyrex mugs
A kaleidoscope of collectable Pyrex mugs (Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis)

So what makes a vintage Pyrex piece valuable?

“It’s all in the eye of the beholder at the end of the day. What might be valuable to some may not be valuable to another,” vintage Pyrex expert and author Stan Savellis told Better Homes and Gardens.

“Many US pieces that go for higher values tend to be test pieces or patterns that never made it officially to market.

“Other pieces that valuable and sought after, like turquoise patterns such as Butterprint or Starburst (both from the US), have a high value yet come up often for purchase.

“Other favourites tend to be Snowflake, which was made in both the US and the UK. The UK versions, which also come in pink and a deep coral (red) colour, tend to be highly sought after.”

Vintage Pyrex snowflakes pattern
The highly collectable snowflakes pattern (Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis)

How much is vintage Australian Pyrex worth? 

“Some Australian pieces are sought after more so than others, such as Flannel Flowers or the Scalloped Pudding Bowls.

“Whilst they may not go for that much, a Flannel Flowers oblong casserole might get to $300 and a pudding bowl might sell for a good $50 each (they’re actually very small too, so that’s a lot!)”

Scalloped pudding bowls
The scalloped pudding bowls are highly sought after (Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis)

The rarest piece of Australian Pyrex is the Carnival design, which was produced in the early 1960s.

“It’s coloured enamel sprayed on clear glass with a really cute carnival scene in white,” explains Stan.

“So far we’ve seen it in olive green, bright orange and a buttercup yellow. The last time I saw one of these sell it was greater than AU$500.”

Olive green Carnival Pyrex casserole dish.
Rare: the Carnival design (Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis)

Got your hands on a Pyrex dish or two?

It could be worth big bucks on Etsy or Ebay. Learn all about it in Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis. You could also join a Pyrex collectors Facebook groups to chat about your pieces with other Pyrex enthusiasts.

Pyrex nesting bowls
Gooseberry nesting bowls (Dots and Diamonds: Your Guide to International Pyrex by Stan Savellis)

In the meantime, keep your eyes peeled at charity shops and garage sales. That forgotten set of nesting bowls in a dusty corner might be worth a small fortune. Good luck!

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