Garden

The annoying lawn weed you should learn to love

Read this before killing your weeds.

To some, clover is an annoying weed commonly found in lawns, but there’s a huge benefit to letting it grow. 

White, red and every other variety of clover they can find – bees love it. 

Why do we need bees?

Bees play an essential part in the production of plants and how our food is produced.

South Australian government website, Good Living, says, “Bees pollinate our plants, which means they carry pollen between plants of different sexes to fertilise them. Or even between different parts of the same plant, which help plants reproduce. Bees even help plants survive by preventing inbreeding.”

growing clover for bees
(Credit: Getty)

Why do bees love clover?

Bees need access to pollen and nectar for protein and energy to survive.

When it comes to clover, white and crimson clover are also a favourite; they have relatively short florets and are a great source of pollen and nectar. 

Bees also love dandelions, flowering eucalypt, lilly pilly, grevillea, herbs and daisies. 

What if my clover is out of control?

Some homeowners consider white clover a weed, and it can be quite invasive if left to its own devices. This is because it catches nitrogen in the air, providing fertiliser for itself and the grass around it. 

To keep your clover under control (leaving some for the bees), you can remove clumps of clover as soon as they appear, before they start flowering. 

For established clover clumps, you can try spraying with a mixture of vinegar and a few drops of dishwashing liquid. 

growing clover for bees
(Credit: Getty)

Avoid chemicals

Avoid using chemicals when tending to your garden, as they can harm bees and other pollinators. Any spraying that must be done should occur at night to cause less harm.

But at the end of the day, if you look after your lawn, it should be able to compete with clover.

You might also like:

Lawn care checklist

How to pick the perfect type of lawn for your location

5 tips to revive your lawn this spring

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